Dog Gone Presents ∆ The Radio Spoke To Me

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This just might be the best mix we ever did.

 

Download ∆ The Radio Spoke To Me 

01. Montibus Communitus ∆ The Pilgrim Under Stars (excerpt)
02. Dymaxion ∆ Ant’lrd Ally
03. Biglietto Per L’Inferno ∆ Confessione
04. Federal Duck ∆ Peace In My Mind
05. Sons Of Adam ∆ I Told You Once Before
06. Fender IV ∆ Malibu Run
07. The Electronic Hole ∆ Love Will Find A Way
08. Grateful Dead/John Oswald ∆ Clouds Cast (excerpt)
09. Bill Plummer & The Cosmic Brotherhood ∆ Journey To The East
10. Mark Fry ∆ The Witch
11. Vasti Bunyan ∆ Coldest Night Of The Year
12. C.O.B. ∆ Spirit Of Love
13. Toolshed ∆ Love In Outer Space
14. Yusef Lateef ∆ Eastern Market
15. Saphire Thinkers ∆ From Within
16. The Millenium – 5 A.M.
17. Fate – Smoke & Stone

 

Prince Rupert’s Drops ∆ “Follow Me”

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Living in New York City certainly has its benefits and drawbacks. Whether those come in the form of readily available bagel spots, high rent costs, or underground hair/nail salons operating in the apartment next door to you (a benefit to some, a drawback to others), there’s an infinite number of things that make you want to stick around, and just as many that make you want to pack up the U-Haul and get outta town in a moments notice. But something that you won’t find anywhere else, and will forever remain a part of New York’s fabric, are bands like Prince Rupert’s Drops.

Typically, these bands don’t stray too far from home and if you happen to live outside the New York locale there’s a good chance they’ve flown passed your radar. This sort of musical anomaly applies to bands like Endless Boogie, Invisible Familiars, and a whole legion of artists that exist largely within the confines of New York.

Prince Rupert’s Drops much anticipated sophomore LP, Climbing Light, is out this week on Beyond Beyond is Beyond. Fans of riff-heavy ’60s psych with a touch of British folk are sure to enjoy the array of sounds crafted by this eclectic musical collective. Have a listen to “Follow Me,” the album’s stunning folk-rocker that finds vocalist Leslie Stein channeling Fairport-era Sandy Denny.

Purchase Climbing Light from the good folks at Beyond Beyond is Beyond.

Prince Rupert’s Drops – “Follow Me”

Mark Fry ∆ “The Witch” (1972)

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Mark Fry’s 1972 psych-folk masterpiece Dreaming With Alice has been getting a lot of play around these parts of late. Recorded in Rome over a three-day period in the summer of ’71, but never properly released unto the world, the physical LP is extremely rare with copies fetching for much as $4K. Throughout the album, songs weave in and out of short, reappearing dream state segments that venture through the visions of Fry’s highly psychedelic dream with Alice—a reference to the Louis Carroll’s Alice Through The Looking Glass. Here we share with you the dark, Eastern-tinged acid-folk number, “The Witch.” Do enjoy, friends.

Mark Fry ∆ “The Witch”

(stream the full album here)

Quilt ∆ Quilt in Marfa

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Back in March, Quilt headed down to the desert town of Marfa, Texas to perform at Mexican Summer’s inaugural festival gathering. While in town, the Bostonian quartet made their way over to a small recording studio located near the nearby Chinati Arts Foundation. It was here that Quilt performed an extended four-song suite depicting their more exploratory live persona. Tune in and stick around for the 26 minute “Milo” that closes out the tape.

Anamai ∆ “Altar Coals” (Video)

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Anna Mayberry put out one of our favorite releases of 2013 with a self-titled EP under her solo moniker Anamai. Ahead of her short run of tour dates kicking off tomorrow night in Ottawa, Anna has shared with us the wintery video for our favourite track on the EP, “Altar Coals.” Be sure to catch Anamai if she’s playing in your locale, and if you haven’t already, pick up the EP from Buzz Records.

Steve Gunn ∆ Way Out Weather

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As fall looms just around the corner, we’re graced with a new offering from guitar virtuoso Steve Gunn that serves as a most fitting soundtrack for the change in season. After stepping out into the open with last year’s Time Off, Gunn took little time establishing himself as the premiere artist in the John Fahey inspired, post-Jack Rose realm of fingerpicked, raga-meets-American folk (something many of us already knew). With Way Out Weather, he takes an even grander step forward both in terms of arrangement and improvisation, as well as the roster of musicians he has aboard. The result is a more expansive, lush, full-band sound that, quite often, resembles the noodley ambling of the Grateful Dead as guitar lines and various stringed instruments weave through one another in an intertwining web of cosmic folk. Check out the video for the title track below.

Way Out Weather comes out October 7th on Paradise of Bachelors.

Also, for those who missed it, be sure to check out Steve Gunn’s collaborative album with British folk artist Mike Cooper, Cantos de Lisboa.

 

Ryley Walker

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Ryley Walker put out one of the best releases of the year so far, folk or otherwise, with his “All Kinds of You” this past April. Coming out on the typically reissue-oriented Tompkins Square Records, it was obvious that his work was exceptional enough to pique their interest, and can sit among their many folk oriented reissues. Sounding like a product of his influences, his debut sways between the fingerpicking abilities of Michael Chapman’s “Fully Qualified Survivor”, the British Folk tendencies of Bert Jansch’s “Birthday Blues”, and the freewheeling live jazz-band dynamic of Tim Buckley’s “Lorca” in a way that is all his own. Throw Ryley’s world weary singing voice into the mix, and you have a very dynamic and creative album that is both of it’s time and out of it’s time. The man has done his homework.

Ryley will be appearing at the NXNE Death Hymn No. 9 Showcase on June 19 at The Smiling Buddha (961 College Street). Doors at 7:30 PM.

∆ Words by Dave Sampson

Widsith ∆ Maker of Song (1972)

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A wise friend once hipped me onto the sounds of New Jersey hippy folk band Widsith and their back roads 1972 LP Maker of Song. It’s been a sunny day favorite ever since. A glance at the cover art shows a photo depicting two, very similar looking, long-haired mustached dudes leaning up against a dusty old barn with nothing else but a set of barrel staves and some mangy grass poking up from the bottom of the shot. While they say you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover, records certainly aren’t books. Here, the music you find within sounds like the cover looks. It’s like the photo was taken moments after they emerged from recording in that very barn. Mics crackle like they’re caked with an inch of dust; fluttery, telecasted guitar lines dance around each other Blind Faith style; tales of the road are sung out in a Dino Valenti-kinda-Van Morrison style drawl. Every song is a gem here, friends.

Long thought to be a lost treasure of the private press world, a few years back Alithia records shed a bit of light on the mystery LP with a lovely reissued version. I haven’t seen it around many places, but it’s out there. Seek one out for yourself.

Widsith ∆ “A Child’s Father’s Song”

Widsith ∆ “Singer In The Marketplace”